Park River Indigenous History, Part 1

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In my ongoing research about the indigenous history of the Park River and the surrounding land, I have been part of an email chain-gaining some information and then being directed to others who know a little more. To date, I have received additional information from Dr. Paul J. Grant-Costa, executive editor of The Yale Indian Papers and Dr. Katherine Hermes, Department of History Chair at Central Connecticut State University.

My notes:

*The Indigenous name of the Park River is unknown.

*The Park River ran through land occupied by the Suckiog.

*Native communities such as the Podunk, Wangunk, and Tunxis used the Park River. All these communities including the Suckiog were connected through family, political and social relationships as well as clanship.

*The Hartford area was part of the Pequot War, which was a conflict between the Pequot tribe and English colonists and their Native American allies. The Pequot obtained the land (that is Hartford today) through Indian conquest just before the Pequot war. After the war the land was returned to the local indigenous communities that had been previously defeated (rather than the Pequots).

*As the watershed grew the Suckiog relocated. Many moved to the Tunxis community.

*The river was most likely used for travel, and as a seasonal resource for food and plants.

*Wangunk territory may have been larger than usually reported.

*Historians and anthropologists created tribes out of what were actually clans. This may have led to misconceptions about each of the communities.

I have reached out to another set of professionals with knowledge surrounding the Park River. Additionally, I am reading and listening to suggested secondary sources. These notes will be posted in a post called Park River Indigenous History Part 2.

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